Tag Archives: dinnerware

Customer Comments

Customer Comments

A recent purchaser of our Fiesta Collection pieces wrote the following:
“Thanks so much for your prompt response to my issue. You and your company have given me the best service imaginable! Thanks again!”

We thank all of you who take time out to write about your pleasant experience with us.

Check out the Wedding Registry at Amazon.com

WeddingIt’s easy and it’s fun. You can pick the room you want to shop for which in our case, of course, would be the kitchen. We have lots of flatware on the site in addition to the Farberware collections. Just go to the site below. Happy Wedding!

http://www.amazon.com/gp/wedding/homepage//ref=pe_224060_28268130_pe_stripe//

Visit our home page for flatware deals

SalesCambridgesilversmiths.com is the place to go to from time to time to see our new deals. We have offerings for as low as $14.99 on occasion that might be of great interest to you…maybe for yourself or as a gift?

What does flatware that is labeled18/10 mean?

Eighteen Ten

We get a lot of questions among comsumers asking what 18/10 means.  Simply put, 18/10 means 18% chromium and 10% nickel.   The 18% chromium is what makes stainless steel – stainless.  Without chromium, the steel can oxidize and rust.   A common misperception is that these numbers refer to the weight of stainless flatware.  These numbers have nothing to do with weight.  These numbers are common in the industry and refer only to the percentage of chromium and nickel that is used in the manufacture of the stainless steel alloy used to make the flatware.  The first number is the percent of chromium in the alloy.  Chromium content is what give stainless it’s strength.  The second number is the percent of nickel.  Nickel is what gives stainless it’s shine and rust-resistance.

As stated on eBay, “18/10 and 18/8 are the optimal amounts of chromium and nickel for stainless steel flatware and are regarded as the highest level of quality.   Some people think that 18/10 is better than 18/8 but in reality there is no difference and both are the highest level of quality.   On the other hand, 18/0 is different and most of the cheaper stainless steel is 18/0.  If numbers are not offered, many times it is because it is 18/0 or the lower level of quality.  Most of the time if stainless is 18/8 or 18/10 the seller will let you know that since it is a selling point if flatware is 18/8 or 18/10.

We hope this input is helpful when making your next flatware purchase.

 

Interesting Terminology

We find it rather odd that Wikipedia, the world’s most-used encyclopedia, does not directly deal with the term “flatware”.  At best, you will be referred to “Tableware” which they go as far as including cutlery.  They state:  “In the United States, tableware is most commonly referred to as dinnerware. Dinnerware can be meant to include glassware, however not flatware.”

We have learned, however, that most people who visit our site (hhtp://cambridgesilversmiths.com) use the key words “flatware” and “silverware” equally.  It suggests that in these times, more and more people are not purchasing silverware like they used to.  Regardless, we are pleased that whichever key word they use, they will still be able to find us.

The Best Wedding Movies Ever!

ImageIf you are engaged or recently wed, your mind may have been on watching a wedding movie possibly for some ideas.  Even if not, you may just like those kind of movies.  Now you can see TLC Weddings’ “10 Best Wedding Movies of ALL Time”.

Go to  http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/weddings/10-best-wedding-movies.htm.  As they say on the site: “Somewhere in the details of planning a wedding, things get a little too serious”.  So enjoy an interlude of some fun and find out how many of these wonderful movies you have seen.  Let us know if you agree with their list.