What does flatware that is labeled18/10 mean?

Eighteen Ten

We get a lot of questions among comsumers asking what 18/10 means.  Simply put, 18/10 means 18% chromium and 10% nickel.   The 18% chromium is what makes stainless steel – stainless.  Without chromium, the steel can oxidize and rust.   A common misperception is that these numbers refer to the weight of stainless flatware.  These numbers have nothing to do with weight.  These numbers are common in the industry and refer only to the percentage of chromium and nickel that is used in the manufacture of the stainless steel alloy used to make the flatware.  The first number is the percent of chromium in the alloy.  Chromium content is what give stainless it’s strength.  The second number is the percent of nickel.  Nickel is what gives stainless it’s shine and rust-resistance.

As stated on eBay, “18/10 and 18/8 are the optimal amounts of chromium and nickel for stainless steel flatware and are regarded as the highest level of quality.   Some people think that 18/10 is better than 18/8 but in reality there is no difference and both are the highest level of quality.   On the other hand, 18/0 is different and most of the cheaper stainless steel is 18/0.  If numbers are not offered, many times it is because it is 18/0 or the lower level of quality.  Most of the time if stainless is 18/8 or 18/10 the seller will let you know that since it is a selling point if flatware is 18/8 or 18/10.

We hope this input is helpful when making your next flatware purchase.

 

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